The Opeongo Line

About the unique heritage and culture of the Madawaska and Opeongo River Valleys.

Sean Conway, host of "The Local," returns with a great story about Chippawa Lodge, once one of Ontario's premier summer resorts located on Lake Kamaniskeg. It was the 1950s and it was a place as exotic and carefree as it now seems lost forever, except in the vivid memories of two gracious women who once first met there as children, Julie Fisher-Ryall and Julie Maloney.

Sean Conway, host of "The Local," returns with a great story about Chippawa Lodge, once one of Ontario's premier summer resorts located on Lake Kamaniskeg. It was the 1950s and it was  a place as exotic and carefree as it now seems lost forever, except in the vivid memories of two gracious women who once first met there as children, Julie Fisher-Ryall and Julie Maloney.

The Opeongo Line proudly presents the second of the Madawaska Valley Public Library's soon-to-be launched independent podcast, "Old, New, Borrowed, Blue."  This month's episode brings together an old story of Barry's Bay that includes it's original Algonquin name, some new books that grace the shelves of the library, more than few things you can borrow, some of which will get you into places for free, and wonderful story from Andrew Lang's Blue Book of Fairy Tales.

Algonquin Voices

Wendy Jocko, the chief of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation at Golden Lake, and her cousin, Jane Ann Chartrand, who hails from Madawaska, talk about growing up in Madawaska and the Algonquin heritage that they both share. 

In celebration of the 60th Anniversary of the Madawaska Valley Public Library, The Opeongo Line launches a new monthly podcast produced by the library's current staff. Made up of four distinct elements, "Old, New, Borrowed, Blue" will remind us all of things past, keep us abreast of new books, popular titles, and finish up in style with a gripping story from The Blue Fairy Tale book. 

Barry Conway reads "Vicker's Creek Mourning," "Bentley's Winchester," "The Acorn Wars," and "Stafford Mountain Starlight,"  four personal essays, or memoirs if you like, that he wrote about what it felt like to grow up as a young boy in Barry's Bay in the 1960s and early 1970s. 

Barry Conway reads "Vicker's Creek Mourning," "Bentley's Winchester," "The Acorn Wars," and "Stafford Mountain Starlight,"  four personal essays, or memoirs if you like, that he wrote about what it felt like to grow up as a young boy in Barry's Bay in the 1960s and early 1970s. 

The Opeongo Readers' Theatre present Lesley Betts, Cathy Chapeskie, Carol Peterson and Lynn Stewart each reading one of four classic short stories by Katherine Mansfield. These include "The Singing Lesson," "The Garden Party," "A Cup of Tea," and "Bliss," all masterful works of World Literature. 

The Opeongo Readers' Theatre present Lesley Betts, Cathy Chapeskie, Carol Peterson and Lynn Stewart each reading one of four classic short stories by Katherine Mansfield. These include "The Singing Lesson," "The Garden Party," "A Cup of Tea," and "Bliss," all masterful works of World Literature. 

As part of The Opeongo Line's effort to both celebrate Canada Day today yet recognize the need for some Indigenous Canadians not to celebrate Canada Day this year, we have brought together Art Milnes and Sean Conway, two seasoned observers of Canadian political history, to discuss how we became an independent nation on July 1st 1867. They look at how our very fallible Fathers of Confederation created Canada in the midst of the 19th Century; what they got right and what they definitely failed to understand. 

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